Sleazy McQueen

Age : 35      Sex : Male      Zodiac : Capricorn      Country : USA      City : Orlando

Type : Exclusive mix      Genre : Disco / House     Software : Ableton / Waves Bundle

Hardware : 1200s, Juno 106, Moog Subphatty, Microkorg, Oberheim Matrix-6R, SRE-555, Alesis Bitrman

 

Interview

Smelly Feet Records: Who is Tony the Pony??

 

Sleazy McQueen: He's dead to me. I used to have this deranged notion that I wanted my DJ persona, Sleazy McQueen to have his own private personality. I was in school and very involved in art and thought it was quite post-modern to have all of Sleazy McQueen's material produced by some other character who appeared to be even more sensational. I think I stopped having "Tony the Pony" as the producer around 2007 or 2008 when I moved to Florida.

 

SFR: Tell us a bit about your history as Sleazy McQueen.

 

SMQ: It's a tongue-in-cheek story... Sleazy McQueen is and always has been a joke, playing to the name, the pictures I used to use for promos and the choice of Sexxxy disco. I want to offer people an escape, my goal has always been to have fun and bring people along for the ride.

 "I want to offer people an escape, my goal has always been to have fun and bring people along for the ride."

SFR: How did you discover ‘Nu-Disco’? Can you give us a little insight into the history of the genre?

 

SMQ: I think Nu-Disco is a misnomer. There's nothing new about it, it's modern Italo disco.

 

SFR: You have had so many releases on so many recognized labels. What keeps you motivated?

 

SMQ: Vinyl baby, vinyl. That being said, by the time the record is actually available, I'm unhappy with my remix and want to put out something better. You're only as good as your last production.

SFR: We know that you have worked with record labels in the past as an A&R agent. Describe the importance of this position and a few of your daily tasks.

 

SMQ: I've worked as an A&R for 6 labels now. The most important thing is to think of a labels artistic direction. It's important for the label to have an identity and to connect between releases, an evolution is great, but you might lose your target buyer if you jump around too much. It's crucial for me to balance the market demands in terms of units sold over the last few releases with what I think the market would like to hear in 6 months. It takes a lot of thought and planning. The only routine is email, I email 24 hours a day.

 "The most important thing is to think of a labels artistic direction. It's important for the label to have an identity and to connect between releases...it takes a lot of thought and planning."

 

SFR: How has all this experience helped you in regards to running your own label, Whiskey Disco? Is there anything you do that helps you stay special?

 

SMQ: Some folks might not like that I pack each release with 3-4 songs. I find it's the best way to please the widest audience. I compile records along a certain theme to make sure each song can vibe with the next. Nowadays, a vinyl can cost $20 after shipping and I want each song to carry its share of the weight.

 

SFR: You’ve done an extensive amount of traveling around the world. Is there any place in particular that stands out to you as having the most unique sound in the genre of ‘Nu-Disco’?

 

SMQ: El Coq in Bogota, Colombia is my favorite place to play. I've developed lasting friends in Colombia, they're always down to have a drink and listen to some slow disco. I've played slow, fast and every tempo in between and they love it..

 "I compile records along a certain theme to make sure each song can vibe with the next... I want each song to carry its share of the weight."

SFR: If you produced a porno, what would you title it??

 

SMQ: hmm. My wife would appreciate it if I plead the 5th.

 

SFR: Sleazy, in a few sentences,, tell us about this mix you made for us. Where did you get your inspiration. Is there anything special you want the audience to know?

 

SMQ: Tastes evolve and styles come and go. Disco is here today, gone tomorrow, but listen to me now: HOUSE isn't going anywhere. I've loved house music since 1996, even in 2005 when I started playing disco and claimed to hate house. This mix is my brand of house, it's an ode to the styles I grew up on, from New York to San Francisco. Heavy percussion to straight up disco, this shit is HOUSE!

 

                        END INTERVIEW

WHISKEY DISCO