Isis Salam 

Sex : Female      Zodiac : Leo      Country : Germany      City : Berlin

Type : Exclusive mix      Genre : House     Software : Ableton / Logic

 

Interview

Smelly Feet Records: Isis Salam. Let’s get right into it. Why do you do it?

 

Isis Salam: I’ve always been a creative person. It is hard for me to envision my life without music and or me not making some kind of sound whether it be through vocals, production or when I play other people's music.

 

SFR: Let’s talk about the early years. What are some experiences that have shaped you into the person you are today?

 

Isis: I don’t think we have enough time to go through the “early years” but i will say I’ve learned a lot and like every other human being I’ve made mistakes, however, I will continue to blame it on the alcohol ... if it worked for Jamie Foxx….well.

 "I’ve always been a creative person. It is hard for me to envision my life without music..."

SFR: Are there any people in particular that have really influenced you musically? How so?

 

Isis: When I first started performing in front of strangers, I caught the eye of DJ Lquence, and she took me under her wing. I carried her crates to get past the ID screening and got a chance to watch her destroy crowds with back to back classics; looking back I guess i’ve always been a student of the old school but I try to hide my purist views. I think it’s important to continue to evolve however I think it’s also important to always have some understanding of the history of whatever genre you plan to shamelessly rip off - we all do it, just got to keep it 100.

 

SFR: We know that you are a very outspoken activist for gender equality. In regards to the music industry, tell us about some of the changes that you see taking place, both positive and negative.

 

Isis: I’m an optimist but I’m also a realist. The thing with “fighting for gender equality”, as a woman of colour ,I can’t ignore the subtle and sometimes blatant racism. Don’t get me wrong, it’s not the days of jim crow in the clubs, however, it’s hard to not see the predominately white crowds sometimes getting down to a mad decent set filled with music from Angola… I love it but I’m like don’t any of you have black friends who could afford to get a ticket? The culture is there but it sometimes feels void of soul.

 

 "...I guess i’ve always been a student of the old school but I try to hide my purist views. I think it’s important to continue to evolve, however I think it’s also important to always have some understanding of the history..."

 

SFR: What do you want to say to the people out there who are part of the problem, whether they know it or not.

 

Isis: I’m not a preacher, ain't nobody got time for that. Besides, there’s too many other things in the world that are more than fucked up that I could get in peoples face about (mainly my google alerts situation, yes my name is Isis…).  I think artists, consumers and industry folks should maybe think about diversifying their portfolio. At the end of the day, most of these kids are sampling soul singers - why don’t you give these women a chance to make some new money, get back in the studio, get on stage - I don’t know, the whole thing can be exhausting to think about sometimes.

SFR: Do you feel that the essence of ‘sending a message’ through music, whether it be voice or sound has become less or more important in today’s society?

 

Isis: I think it’s easier to get away with saying less these days, whether or not thats a good thing I think depends on the person creating the music. Some people are amazing at capturing deep feelings and concepts with just “well placed twerking”. Others aren’t.

 

SFR: Give us your top 5.

 

Isis: I hate this question. My top 5 is constantly changing - also top 5 what? In no particular order my top 5 artists are, Quincy Jones, Nina Simone, Richard Pryor, Erykah Badu, Maya Angelou.

 "I think it’s easier to get away with saying less these days, whether or not that's a good thing I think depends on the person creating the music."

SFR: Isis, in a few sentences, tell us about this mix you made for us. Where did you get your inspiration. Is there anything special you want the audience to know?

 

Isis: First, I want to say I don’t really consider myself a DJ, more of a music curator . l have a deep respect for the history and the culture so, “ain't no half stepping”! With that said, I hope you guys enjoy this mix I put together of tracks I’m currently playing in my sets when I do play out and when I just feel like dancing at home with a glass of wine in my underwear.

 

                        END INTERVIEW